OUR

Students

CASE STUDIES

Reece Bahia

Musical Theatre

Luca Buratti

Public Services

Izzy Wall

Creative Media

A young movie maker from Stratford-upon-Avon College was thrilled to have one of her films screened at an exclusive RSC Showcase event in London and she was even asked to present a speech to the guests.

19-year-old creative media student Izzy Wall, from Evesham, entered the RSC’s For The Good of Rome film challenge at the suggestion of her college lecturer, as an extracurricular opportunity to showcase the filmmaking skills the students had developed during their course.

The challenge, open to 16-19 year olds, asked students to make a film responding to the themes in Shakespeare’s Roman plays, and from a choice of three controversial statements, Izzy, who aims to become a professional cinematographer, chose “The qualities we admire in male leaders are seen as negative in women.”

Describing how she produced her film, a 3-minute documentary-style short, she explained: “I chose a very simple format: I interviewed lots of different subjects – family, friends and colleagues from my course – asking them about their responses to male and female leaders, and intercut the footage in a fast-paced style.”

A community-minded Uniformed Public Services student at Stratford-upon-Avon College is playing a major role in a project to help the homeless.

Luca Buratti, 19 from Stratford-upon-Avon, is Project Leader of Rotary ShelterBus, an ambitious scheme organised by the Rotary Club of Birmingham Breakfast with the aim of providing practical assistance for the homeless and rough sleepers in Birmingham and the surrounding areas.

ShelterBus plans to transform a double-decker bus into a mobile shelter, complete with ten individual sleeping areas, washing and cooking facilities, and even a separate consultation room where counselling or medical care can be given to those in need. In the longer term, they hope their temporary support base, by working in cooperation with relevant local organisations, will help the homeless find a permanent home. As Project Leader, Luca is using his impressive organisational skills to oversee ShelterBus, including securing the bus itself and liaising with the council for permission to run the scheme.

Public spirited Luca’s service to the community is long-standing and he was awarded membership of the Rotary Club last year in recognition of his commitment to community projects and tireless charity work. Commenting on receiving the honour, Luca said at the time “It’s really nice to receive recognition for all the activities I worked on to raise money for charity. I’d love to continue running events for them; I’ve found I’m really quite good at it and it’s very rewarding.”

Luca had this to say about his work for Rotary Shelter bus: “This is a fantastic project that will really reduce the problem of homelessness in Birmingham. It’s great to be part of something that will provide such practical help and I’m proud that I was given the job of project leader.”

He has this message for any other young people thinking about getting involved in community events or charity work: “Go ahead and do it. You’ll provide a great service for others, and it gives you a wonderful feeling of satisfaction and happiness.”

A young movie maker from Stratford-upon-Avon College was thrilled to have one of her films screened at an exclusive RSC Showcase event in London and she was even asked to present a speech to the guests.

19-year-old creative media student Izzy Wall, from Evesham, entered the RSC’s For The Good of Rome film challenge at the suggestion of her college lecturer, as an extracurricular opportunity to showcase the filmmaking skills the students had developed during their course.

The challenge, open to 16-19 year olds, asked students to make a film responding to the themes in Shakespeare’s Roman plays, and from a choice of three controversial statements, Izzy, who aims to become a professional cinematographer, chose “The qualities we admire in male leaders are seen as negative in women.”

Describing how she produced her film, a 3-minute documentary-style short, she explained: “I chose a very simple format: I interviewed lots of different subjects – family, friends and colleagues from my course – asking them about their responses to male and female leaders, and intercut the footage in a fast-paced style.”